Monday, July 18, 2011

Fort Smith Musket Fire



(This picture can be enlarged by clicking on it.)

When we visited Fort Smith National Historic Site, we saw rejectors dressed as 1830s-era soldiers firing muskets. Looking at what happened when the second soldier pulled the trigger, those muskets must have been as dangerous for the person firing as they were for the person on the other end.

23 comments:

rainfield61 said...

It is indeed very dangerous looking at the explosion.

diane b said...

I agree with you. I wouldn't like to be at either end.

Ruth's Photo Blog said...

YIKES!!!

Ash said...

Omg! :-(

Pam said...

Reading your description I can just picture.. smoke coming out the barrel, a big kick-back and a man lying flat on his back :)

Nice shot, George.. I'm sure no one was injured in the shooting.

be well, be Happy
Pam

Sandra said...

oh boy, gunfire! i love things that go boom and would have loved to see/hear this. now I can see it, but where are the sound effects.

Mildred said...

You captured an amazing shot of the action, George!

Betty Manousos@ Cut and Dry said...

yes, yikes!

have a great week ahead!

imac said...

I can feel the pain on my shoulder lol.

Indrani said...

Hmmm...
I have aimed once... part of my service training.

EG Wow said...

Whoa! It must have been very scary in the 1830s! Looks kinda scary now too.

A Lady's Life said...

I agree. Sometimes I wonder why they even bothered to use them?

Ryan said...

They are braver men than me, looks like a fun day out.

LV said...

All guns are dangerous to me.

Fred Alton said...

I'm so glad guns are now much improved! It's hard for me to imagine having to carry powder, wadding, lead, a mold for making shot and a ram-rod. A few bullets in my pocket are heavy enough!

The Incredible Woody said...

I loved my visit to Ft. Smith. It is a very cool town:)

KathyA said...

Oh my! Was he burned?

SandyCarlson said...

Our soldiers have always been guinea pigs. Yeesh. The chances they take and took. These historical reenactments are important because they help us appreciate all we've got-and don't have to do.

troutbirder said...

No kidding. Now think of the people who use black powder in Civil War cannons.

Ann said...

you and Betsy did not take part too? I can imagine Betsy hand churning a tub of butter.

Craver Vii said...

Great catch, there! It makes a good argument for safety goggles, doesn't it?

Janie said...

Oops, not good to have the musket powder blow up in your face! You made a great capture here, snapping at just the right time.

Lynda said...

Twenty years ago, we had a neighbor who LOVED doing Civil War reenactments. His preschool son was so taken with what his dad did, that the young boy would patrol the perimeter of their yard with a wooden musket.