Monday, September 21, 2009

The Beasley House



(This picture can be enlarged by clicking on it.)

This picture was taken in June, 2007, in Petersburg, Virginia. The Beasley house served as the headquarters of General Robert E. Lee late in 1864. He used the house as headquarters only for about a month, but spent very little time in or near the house as he kept riding along his lines trying to keep General U. S. Grant at bay. It was from this house, however, that Lee began urging President Jefferson Davis to consider offering freedom to any slave that would agree to serve in the southern army.

11 comments:

bARE-eYED sUN said...

weird. :-0

we visited Galena, Illinois this Summer. and posted pix of U.S.Grant's house.

we're so pleased that we reached your post today, it reminded us of our visit.

guess we'll visit Petersburg soon, in order to pair 'em up.

:-)


thsnks for the post.

..
.ero

Busy Bee Suz said...

What a sweet looking home. If only those walls could talk!

Hilda said...

A pretty house with a magnificent history!

Thank you for posting this George. I enjoy learning more about your history through your blog. I find it the details fascinating!

Your EG Tour Guide said...

It's a lovely old house still in good condition. Did your relatives fight in the Confederate army?

Sunny said...

A grand old house!
Sunny :)

Karen said...

Oh I like that house. Would be nice to sit out on the porch.

rainfield61 said...

General Robert E. Lee may have come back to this house after 1864.

Janie said...

I didn't know that Lee urged freeing slaves in return for army service.
Interesting to see a photo of this historic house.

SandyCarlson said...

Quite a lovely place. Thanks for sharing that bit of history, George

Carrizo said...

Great photo George.

I see that today my "historical tounée" is continuing. First I visited in exhibition the story of Sitting Bull in Tampere and now my historical trek is continuing with General Robert E. Lee.

The Tile Lady said...

It's a gorgeous house! And well cared for...and with such a wonderful history! Thanks so much for sharing it!